Glossary of terms used on this site

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Term Main definition
Information Security
The protection of information for the purposes of preventing loss, unauthorized access and/or misuse. It is also the process of assessing threats and risks to information and the procedures and controls to preserve confidentiality, integrity and availability of information.
Internet Service Provider
A company that provides Internet access to homes and businesses through modem dial-up, DSL, cable modem broadband, dedicated T1/T3 lines or wireless connections.
Lawfulness
Data subjects must be aware of the fact that their personal data will be processed, including how the data will be collected, kept and used, to allow them to make an informed decision about whether they agree with such processing and to enable them to exercise their data protection rights. The GDPR outlines six bases for the lawful processing of personal data.
Legal Basis for Processing
The General Data Protection Regulation requires data controllers to demonstrate one of these six legal bases for processing: consent, necessity, contract requirement, legal obligation, protection of data subject, public interest, or legitimate interest of the controller. The controller is required to provide a privacy notice, specify in the privacy notice the legal basis for the processing personal data in each instance of processing, and when relying on the legitimate interest ground must describe the legitimate interests pursued.
Legitimate Interests of Controller
The lawful processing of a Data Subject's personal data, the fact that the processing is necessary for the purposes of legitimate interests pursued by the University, or by a third party or parties to whom the data are disclosed.
Location Data
Data indicating the geographical position of a device, including data relating to the latitude, longitude, or altitude of the device, the direction of travel of the user, or the time the location information was recorded.
Necessity
Necessity along with proportionality, is one of two factors data controllers should consider as they apply the principle of data minimization, as required by the General Data Protection Regulation. Necessity considers the amount of data to be collected and whether it is necessary in relation to the stated purposes for which it is being processed.
Openness
A fair information practices principle. There should be a general policy of openness about developments, practices and policies with respect to personal data. Means should be readily available to establish the existence and nature of personal data, and the main purposes of their use, as well as the identity and usual residence of the data controller. Closely linked with transparency.
Opt-In
One of two central concepts of choice. It means an individual makes an active affirmative indication of choice; i.e., checking a box signalling a desire to share his or her information with third parties. The General Data Protection Regulation's definition of consent as requiring a "clear affirmative act" makes opt-in the default standard for consent acquisition.
Opt-Out
One of two central concepts of choice. It means an individual
Personal data

Any information relating to a person (a ‘ data subject ’) who can be identified, directly or indirectly, in particular by reference to an identifier such as a name, an identification number, location data, an online identifier or to one or more factors specific to the physical, physiological, genetic, mental, economic, cultural or social identity of that person.

Privacy
Privacy is the ability of an individual to be left alone, out of public view, and in control of information about oneself. One can distinguish the ability to prevent intrusion in one's physical space ("physical privacy", for example with regard to the protection of the private home) and the ability to control the collection and sharing of information about oneself ("informational privacy"). One can distinguish the ability to prevent intrusion in one's physical space ("physical privacy", for example with regard to the protection of the private home) and the ability to control the collection and sharing of information about oneself ("informational privacy"). The concept of privacy therefore overlaps, but does not coincide, with the concept of data protection.
Privacy by Design
Privacy by design aims at building privacy and data protection up front, into the design specifications and architecture of information and communication systems and technologies, in order to facilitate compliance with privacy and data protection principles.
Privacy Notice
A statement made to a data subject that describes how an organisation collects, uses, retains and discloses personal information. A privacy notice may be referred to as a privacy statement, a fair processing statement or, sometimes, a privacy policy. The General Data Protection Regulation requires a controller to provide a privacy notice prior to processing and to specify in the privacy notice the legal basis for the processing, in addition to other details, such as the contact information for the organisation's Data Protection Officer.
Processing
means any operation or set of operations which is performed on personal data or on sets of personal data, whether or not by automated means, such as collection, recording, organisation, structuring, storage, adaptation or alteration, retrieval, consultation, use, disclosure by transmission, dissemination or otherwise making available, alignment or combination, restriction, erasure or destruction.
Processor
means a natural or legal person, public authority, agency or other body which processes personal data on behalf of the controller.
Profiling
means any form of automated processing of personal data consisting of the use of personal data to evaluate certain personal aspects relating to a natural person, in particular to analyse or predict aspects concerning that natural person
Pseudonymisation
means the processing of personal data in such a manner that the personal data can no longer be attributed to a specific data subject without the use of additional information, provided that such additional information is kept separately and is subject to technical and organisational measures to ensure that the personal data are not attributed to an identified or identifiable natural person.
Public Authority
A public authority as defined by the Freedom of Information Act 2000 or a Scottish public authority as defined by the Freedom of Information (Scotland) Act 2002.
Public Interest
One of the six legal bases for processing personal data outlined by the General Data Protection Regulation is processing necessary for the performance of a task carried out in the public interest or in the exercise of official authority vested in the controller.

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